Tag Archives: money

What Ethical Entrepreneurs and Jobseekers Can Learn from Successful Bankrobbers

How do you get money fast when jobs or clients are scarce? Mention that challenge in any brainstorming group, and inevitably someone will joke, “rob a bank.”  Laughter will inevitably ensue, then the group will go on to same-old ideas that already haven’t worked.

But what if you could turn the outrageousness of the bankrobbing suggestion into a catalyst for absolutely ethical client-building or job-finding strategies? Here’s one set of tips you could discover with quick brainstorming questions. Continue reading

Spirit, Money, and Relationships: Guest Post by Kim Leatherdale

Economic problems cause major stress (I hear you saying “no duh!”) Job loss, cut in pay, cut in hours, or failure at a business can put pressure on a people.  Financial stress mars the spirit and makes even the healthiest person forget good relational skills. Too often these external pressures erode relationships inside and outside of work.

So, how do you safeguard all your relationships in these economically trying times?

Continue reading

The Career and Money Visionary You Were Born to Be

After 20 years of studying how people either block or shape visions for work and life, I’ve concluded that

1) the potential to be visionary is in all of us, though visionary potentials like instincts, imagination and intuition are more likely to be quashed than developed;

2) the worlds of work and money and everything else that affects us are in sore need of real vision, not just same-old strategies or the newest shiny thing; and

3) being the visionaries we were born to be is a lot simpler than trying to live without vision. Continue reading

Is Love Truly All We Need for Great Work and Money Dealings?

In a week where the news was dominated by yet another terrorist attempt and by a study showing widespread employee unhappiness, it was a treat to discover a world-wide sing-out of John Lennon and Paul McCartney’s “All You Need is Love.” Sponsored by Starbucks, this expertly sliced video montage from singers around the world offers an instant lift for any dreary day.

Imagine, to use another John Lennon pet phrase, that it’s true.  Love IS all you need to bring more integrity, more purpose, more joy, more peace in the world through the ways  we work and deal with money.  Actually, I’m far from the first person to pose this idea.  One of the best discussions of love, business and money was Tim Sanders’ wonderful article, “Love is the Killer App” in Fast Company Magazine. Continue reading

When Making A Decision Consider All Costs: By Guest Blogger Kimberly Weichel

Every decision has a cost, which is usually more than just the published cost of an item or service. Sometimes, while trying to save money in the short run, we actually spend more in the long run. Sometimes, “free” things cost a lot. And sometimes inaction has a cost, spiritually and emotionally as well as financially.

While we are accustomed to thinking about expenditures only as spending money, there are also such costs and potential benefits as impact on time, health, relationships, and ability to live purposefully. Thus, the wise choice considers more than just money in calculating ROI (return on investment). Continue reading

Creating a Culture of Integrity for Work and Money

If all the expensive fallout from corporate, political or other shenanigans could be traced to a few greedy rotten apples, then it should be easy for all us good, non-greedy apples to toss out the rest.

But greed is just one variety of fraud, waste and abuse that have long been rampant in our world. All are supported by a culture that makes it equally hard to confront wrong-doing or to envision a culture based on honesty, sustainability, and compassion. Continue reading

“Julie and Julia” — Great Role Models for Joyous Work

Probably the most under-rated spiritual value is joy. Maybe that’s what Jesus implied when he said that to enter the kingdom of heaven, we need to become again like little kids — especially if we’ve become too accustomed to dry, boring “worship” services, deadly dull diets, and tedious workdays.

True joy is an amazingly unselfish spiritual gift. Joy begets a light heart, plenty of energy, resourcefulness, and the longing to help others find joy. Thanks to the spirit and work movement, I’ve thoroughly learned how to distill joy out of any task, even when reality also includes sorrow, grief or other honest emotions.

Now, thanks to the new movie “Julie and Julia”, my full joy is back in cooking, eating, and sharing food with others. That may not be my paid work, but it sure affects all my paid work and dealings with money. Plus, I’ve got a whole new pair of role models for persisting in any vision around work and money. Continue reading

From Overspending or Tightwad Habits to Wise and Satisfying Financial Management

A guest post by Dr. Nancy Irwin

A Wharton School of Business that finds “tightwads” and “spendthrifts” tend to attract one another, even though they both consciously felt they’d be more comfortable with mates of similar spending habits.   So much for the limited power of the conscious mind!

The subconscious, which is where all behavior comes from, is much more powerful than the conscious mind.  This can be really great news, if you know how to work it. Continue reading

Tao (the Way) not Dow (the Jones numbers) for Financial Serenity

Tao. Dow. Both are pronounced “dow,” but here the similarity ends.

“Tao” means the way, path or guiding principle for working with faith, integrity and meaning in a mysterious universe.

The concept of way, path or guiding principle is central to all religious faiths and secular philosophies — not just the ancient faith of Taoism. Continue reading

Quick Spiritual Makeover for Dreadful Jobs (or Lack Thereof)

Raise your hand if you dislike and/or feel overwhelmed by your job. Also lift your hand if your job now is to find a job while dealing with the hard realities of ever-diminishing (or already diminished) financial resources.

Congratulations! You’ve just taken the first step to a spiritual makeover of any problem. By admitting the problem, your attention, at least for a few seconds, is diverted from any 24-hour stress/worry/whatever negative programming that is polluting your right mind, and you’re open for at least a few nanoseconds to the thought, “maybe things don’t have to be this way. Maybe they can be better.” Continue reading